Retracted papers keep being cited as if they weren’t retracted. Two researchers suggest how Elsevier could help fix that.

As many readers know, even after a paper’s retracted, it will continue to be cited — often by researchers who don’t realize the findings are problematic. But when, and in what context, do those citations occur? In a recent paper in Scientometrics, Judit Bar-Ilan of Bar-Ilan University in

Read More Retracted papers keep being cited as if they weren’t retracted. Two researchers suggest how Elsevier could help fix that.

OASPA’s pick of open access events for the rest of 2018

At OASPA, we’ve always found it difficult to keep up with the number of excellent events happening within open access and related areas of publishing, which is why we launched our community events calendar last year. You can use our calendar to

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DARPA Wants to Boost Your Body’s Defenses ― By ‘Tuning’ Your Genes

From vaccines to antidotes for drug poisoning, modern medicine has given us a lot of tools to protect us against health threats. But what if your genes could be harnessed to provide even better protection? And what if this could

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Historic Treponema pallidum genomes from Colonial Mexico retrieved from archaeological remains

Abstract Treponema pallidum infections occur worldwide causing, among other diseases, syphilis and yaws. In particular sexually transmitted syphilis is regarded as a re-emerging infectious disease with millions of new infections annually. Here we present three historic T. pallidum genomes (two from T. pallidum ssp. pallidum and one from T. pallidum ssp. pertenue) that

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Here’s Why We’re Attracted to People of a Similar Height, Scientists Say

Gazing longingly into your partner’s eyes is easier to do when you’re both standing at about the same height, and according to a new study, there’s a good reason for that. Researchers in the UK have found that the genes

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Scientists Solve The Case Of The Missing Subplate, With Wide Implications For Brain Science

The disappearance of an entire brain region should be cause for concern. Yet, for decades scientists have calmly maintained that one brain area, the subplate, simply vanishes during the course of human development. Recently, however, research has revealed genetic similarities between

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Food Composition Data in the Netherlands: NEVO Online 2013 Updated Version Released

Abstracts Background and Aim: The Dutch national food composition database (NEVO database) is used for all food and nutrition related work in the Netherlands. The database is managed at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment. Recently the updated

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Gene therapy via ultrasound could offer new therapeutic tool

Combining ultrasound energy and microbubbles to poke holes in cells may prove to be a new tool in the fight against cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC. A study on this gene

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