Latest Research News on Aspergillus Sp: Dec – 2019

Aspergillus sp. lipase: Potential biocatalyst for industrial use

The lipases obtained from the Aspergillus present remarkable importance in biotechnological applications, and various studies have reported the importance of the fermentation parameters, like nutrients, temperature and fermentation time. Moreover, many Aspergillus spp. lipases present several properties of immense industrial importance, like their pH and temperature stability and excellent enantioselectivity. Different strategies are utilized in order to immobilize crude or purified Aspergillus spp. lipases. Hence, Aspergillus spp. lipases are studied for various industrial applications like within the food and detergent industries, and also within the kinetic resolution of pharmaceuticals and chiral intermediates. This review highlights the assembly, purification, characterization, applications and immobilization of lipases from Aspergillus spp. [1]

Production of the raw-starch digesting amylase of Aspergillus sp. K-27

Aspergillus sp. K-27, isolated from soil, produced extracellular glucoamylase and α-amylase using wheat starch as a carbon source, and its productivity was doubled by the addition of α-methyl-d-glucoside to the medium. The crude enzyme preparation, which was found to be a mix of 70% glucoamylase and 30% α-amylase, well degraded not only cereal starches but also tuber and root starches, and therefore the initial velocity for potato starch was 72% of that for corn starch. [2]

Notoamides A–D: Prenylated Indole Alkaloids Isolated from a Marine‐Derived Fungus, Aspergillus sp.

This work was supported by Grants‐in‐Aid for research project (No. 16590005) and for research project on Priority Areas (No. 18032033) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan, also as by a grant from the Research Foundation for Pharmaceutical Sciences. Support from the NIH is additionally gratefully acknowledged (CA70375 to R.M.W.). [3]

What is the clinical significance of positive blood cultures with Aspergillus sp in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients? A 23 year experience

Hematopoietic somatic cell (HSC) transplantation is that the most frequent underlying predisposing condition to invasive aspergillosis. However, the importance of positive blood culture with Aspergillus sp during this particular population remains uncertain. We retrospectively reviewed all blood cultures performed in 1453 patients who received HSC transplant at our institution between 1980 and 2002. We identified 19 patients with positive blood cultures with Aspergillus sp. just one of those patients had clinical, histologic or microbiologic evidence of invasive aspergillosis. [4]

Bioefficacy Test of Different Chemotherapeutic Substances against Aspergillus sp. and Chrysosporium sp. Contaminants of Tissue-Cultured Abaca (Musa textiles NEE.) during Initial Stage of Micropropagation

The study was conducted at the Tissue Culture Laboratory and Crop lab of the University of Southeastern Philippines to check the efficacy of selected antibiotics and antifungal agents within the elimination of the common fungi contaminant of tissue-cultured abaca meriplants during initial stage of propagation on the Murashige and Skoog medium. [5]

Reference

[1] Contesini, F.J., Lopes, D.B., Macedo, G.A., da Graça Nascimento, M. and de Oliveira Carvalho, P., 2010. Aspergillus sp. lipase: potential biocatalyst for industrial use. Journal of molecular catalysis b: enzymatic, 67(3-4), (Web Link)

[2] Abe, J.I., Bergmann, F.W., Obata, K. and Hizukuri, S., 1988. Production of the raw-starch digesting amylase of Aspergillus sp. K-27. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 27(5-6), (Web Link)

[3] Kato, H., Yoshida, T., Tokue, T., Nojiri, Y., Hirota, H., Ohta, T., Williams, R.M. and Tsukamoto, S., 2007. Notoamides A–D: Prenylated Indole Alkaloids Isolated from a Marine‐Derived Fungus, Aspergillus sp. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 46(13), (Web Link)

[4] What is the clinical significance of positive blood cultures with Aspergillus sp in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients? A 23 year experience
E Simoneau, M Kelly, A C Labbe, J Roy & M Laverdière
Bone Marrow Transplantation volume 35, (Web Link)

[5] S. Cobrado, J. and M. Fernandez, A. (2017) “Bioefficacy Test of Different Chemotherapeutic Substances against Aspergillus sp. and Chrysosporium sp. Contaminants of Tissue-Cultured Abaca (Musa textiles NEE.) during Initial Stage of Micropropagation”, Journal of Advances in Microbiology, 4(1), (Web Link)

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