Latest Research News on Cabbage Production: Jan – 2020

Efficacy of Mosquito Netting for Sustainable Small Holders’ Cabbage Production in Africa

The efficacy of a mosquito netting to guard cabbages, Brassica oleracea L., against pests was investigated in field trials in Benin, West Africa . A polyester net covered the plants in the dark by employing a wood armature. internet was removed during the day to stop overheating and excessive shade, both problems of insect-proof screens used under tropical conditions. the amount of all lepidopteran larvae with netting protection and foliar insecticide sprays was significantly less than the unprotected control. the amount of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), was significantly lower with netting protection compared with foliar insecticide sprays and control. Netting treated with deltamethrin gave total protection of young plants against the aphid Lipaphis erysimi (Kaltenbach). At harvest, the amount of marketable cabbages protected with untreated netting was significantly higher compared with the assembly with foliar insecticide sprays. The protection of cabbages with netting are often an economically viable method. [1]

Assessing the potential impact of biological control of Plutella xylostella (diamondback moth) in cabbage production in Kenya

This study assessed the potential economic impact of the introduction of Diadegma semiclausum, an exotic parasitoid of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella, DBM), on cabbage production in Kenya. The study first established yield losses caused by DBM through two methods: measurements from farmer-managed fields and thru farmers’ interviews. Crop losses were calculated at 31% from farmer-managed fields, and at 36% from farmer interviews. With a crop loss of 31%, yield loss was estimated at 6.8 tons/ha or US$ 452.9/ha, and at US$ 7.9 million per annum for the entire country. Control costs as provided from the interviews, amounted to US$ 118.9/ha. [2]

Quantity and Frequency of Trickle and Furrow Irrigation for Efficient Cabbage Production 1

Trickle irrigation, with its capability of small, frequent irrigation applications, has aroused considerable interest due to possible increased production and decreased water requirements. For this reason, a replicated field investigation was conducted to guage quantity and frequency of trickle, modified‐furrow, and standard‐furrow irrigations on the expansion of cabbage (Brassica oleracea capitata), employing a moderately saline water on a fine‐textured soil. Trickle and modified‐furrow irrigations were scheduled to provide various quantities of water supported ratios of the plant’s estimated consumptive use at frequencies of three , 6, and 12 days. The modified furrow was alittle furrow constructed within the center of the bed to simulate a field practice like trickle irrigation. The standard‐furrow irrigation was supported plant symptoms and on soil‐moisture depletaion criteria. Consumptive‐use measurements were made by gravimetric soil‐moisture sampling on the standard‐furrow irrigation. Recorded data included yield, quality of production, and water‐use efficiency. [3]

A modelling methodology to assess the effect of insect pest control on agro-ecosystems

The extensive use of chemical pesticides for pest management in agricultural systems can entail risks to the complex ecosystems consisting of economic, ecological and social subsystems. to research the negative and positive effects of external or internal disturbances on complex ecosystems, we proposed an ecological two-sidedness approach which has been applied to the planning of pest-controlling strategies for pesticide pollution management. However, catastrophe theory has not been initially applied to the present approach. Thus, we used an approach of integrating ecological two-sidedness with a multi-criterion evaluation method of catastrophe theory to research the complexity of agro-ecosystems disturbed by the insecticides and sort the simplest insect pest-controlling strategy in cabbage production. [4]

Economics and Efficiency of Rain-Fed Cabbage Production (Brassica oleracea Var. Capitata) in Kaduna State, Nigeria

Aims: to research Economics of Rain-fed Cabbage Production in Kaduna State, Nigeria.
Study Design: Primary data were collected from 130 cabbage farmers with the help of structured questionnaire.
Place and Duration of Study: This study was administered in three government areas (Kudan, Sabon-Gari and Zaria) in Kaduna state during 2015 cropping season.
Methodology: Multistage purposive and sampling techniques were employed for data collection. [5]

Reference

[1] Martin, T., Assogba-Komlan, F., Houndete, T., Hougard, J.M. and Chandre, F., 2006. Efficacy of mosquito netting for sustainable small holders’ cabbage production in Africa. Journal of economic entomology, 99(2), (Web Link)

[2] Macharia, I., Löhr, B. and De Groote, H., 2005. Assessing the potential impact of biological control of Plutella xylostella (diamondback moth) in cabbage production in Kenya. Crop Protection, 24(11), (Web Link)

[3] Bucks, D.A., Erie, L.J. and French, O.F., 1974. Quantity and Frequency of Trickle and Furrow Irrigation for Efficient Cabbage Production 1. Agronomy journal, 66(1), (Web Link)

[4] A modelling methodology to assess the effect of insect pest control on agro-ecosystems
Nian-Feng Wan, Xiang-Yun Ji, Jie-Xian Jiang & Bo Li
Scientific Reports volume 5, (Web Link)

[5] Abdulrahman, S., Magaji, B. D., Onwuaroh, A. S., Adejoh, O. S. and Binuyo, G. (2018) “Economics and Efficiency of Rain-Fed Cabbage Production (Brassica oleracea Var. Capitata) in Kaduna State, Nigeria”, Journal of Experimental Agriculture International, 28(6), (Web Link)

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