News Update on Emotional Intelligence: May 2020

The intelligence of emotional intelligence
Emotional intelligence is a type of social intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one’s own and others’ emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use the information to guide one’s thinking and actions (Salovey & Mayer, 1990). We discuss (a) whether intelligence is an appropriate metaphor for the construct, and (b) the abilities and mechanisms that may underlie emotional intelligence. [1]

Emotional intelligence meets traditional standards for an intelligence
An intelligence must meet several standard criteria before it can be considered scientifically legitimate. First, it should be capable of being operationalized as a set of abilities. Second, it should meet certain correlational criteria: the abilities defined by the intelligence should form a related set (i.e., be intercorrelated), and be related to pre-existing intelligences, while also showing some unique variance. Third, the abilities of the intelligence should develop with age and experience. In two studies, adults (N=503) and adolescents (N=229) took a new, 12-subscale ability test of emotional intelligence: the Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale (MEIS). The present studies show that emotional intelligence, as measured by the MEIS, meets the above three classical criteria of a standard intelligence. [2]

Emotional intelligence as a standard intelligence
The authors have claimed that emotional intelligence (EI) meets traditional standards for an intelligence (J. D. Mayer, D. R. Caruso, & P. Salovey, 1999). R. D. Roberts, M. Zeidner, and G. Matthews (see record 2001-10055-001) questioned whether that claim was warranted. The central issue raised by Roberts et al. concerning Mayer et al. (1999) is whether there are correct answers to questions on tests purporting to measure EI as a set of abilities. To address this issue (and others), the present authors briefly restate their view of intelligence, emotion, and EI. They then present arguments for the reasonableness of measuring EI as an ability, indicate that correct answers exist, and summarize recent data suggesting that such measures are, indeed, reliable. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) [3]

Emotional Intelligence, Sexual Functioning, and Subjective Sexual Well-being in Portuguese Adults

Not many studies exist that relate emotional intelligence with sexual variables, such as sexual functioning and subjective sexual well-being. In order to fill the gap in the research, we developed this study with the following objectives. First, we aim to assess levels of emotional intelligence, sexual functioning, and subjective sexual well-being in a large sample of Portuguese adults. Second, we seek to compare differences in emotional intelligence, sexual functioning, and subjective sexual well-being between genders and age groups. [4]

Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Teachers’ Practical Skills Performance in Radio, Television and Electronic Work

The study investigated the relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and teachers’ practical skills performance in Radio, Television and Electronic Work (RTV). The study adopted a correlational research design. The population for the study was 42 subjects. This constituted all the RTV teachers from all the technical colleges offering RTV at National Technical Certificate (NTC) level in Katsina and Kaduna states. Three research questions guided the study. The instruments for data collection included a standardized Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS) as well as a researcher developed Teachers’ Practical Skills Performance Questionnaire (TPSPQ). [5]

Reference

[1]  Mayer, J.D. and Salovey, P., 1993. The intelligence of emotional intelligence.

[2] Mayer, J.D., Caruso, D.R. and Salovey, P., 1999. Emotional intelligence meets traditional standards for an intelligence. Intelligence, 27(4), pp.267-298.

[3] Mayer, J.D., Salovey, P., Caruso, D.R. and Sitarenios, G., 2001. Emotional intelligence as a standard intelligence.

[4] Silva, P., Pereira, H., Esgalhado, G., Monteiro, S., Afonso, R. and Loureiro, M. (2016) “Emotional Intelligence, Sexual Functioning, and Subjective Sexual Well-being in Portuguese Adults”, Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 15(1), pp. 1-11. doi: 10.9734/BJESBS/2016/23481.

[5] Raymond, E. and Hassan, J. (2015) “Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Teachers’ Practical Skills Performance in Radio, Television and Electronic Work”, Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 13(2), pp. 1-9. doi: 10.9734/BJESBS/2016/22150.

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