Tackling the Fusarium spp. Related Mycotoxins in Malting and Brewing Industries

The principal constituents of the commodities used for brewing are fungi, yeasts and bacteria, common microorganisms arising from the field or storage facilities. Along with metabolites from plants, their metabolites lead to the consistency and protection of the final products – malt and beer. The microorganisms most commonly associated with the protection and consistency of beer-producing cereals belong to Fusarium spp. They have a big impact on yields in the region, which alters and decreases farmers’ economic performance. The real issue, however, is their harmful metabolites, mycotoxins, that affect human and animal health. The emerging analytical methodologies extend the range of recognised toxins that can pose a danger to humans and animals, arising from microorganisms and plants. Throughout the barley-beer chain, it is important to control microflora and, in particular, to act promptly on the proliferation of undesired microorganisms before and throughout malting with suppressive methods. An significant action is the avoidance of the occurrence of mycotoxins in final products and by-products. In addition to the mycotoxin in beer malt, Fusarium spp. Upon opening of the bottle or can, it can cause gushing, an excessive over foaming of beer. Gushing can also lead to economic losses and the scepticism of consumers about the quality of the beer chosen.

Author (s) Details

Kristina Habschied
Faculty of Food Technology Osijek, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, F. Kuhača 20, 31000 Osijek, Croatia.

Vinko Krstanović
Faculty of Food Technology Osijek, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, F. Kuhača 20, 31000 Osijek, Croatia.

Krešimir Mastanjević
Faculty of Food Technology Osijek, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, F. Kuhača 20, 31000 Osijek, Croatia.

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