Relationship between Blood Pressure, Blood Glucose and Body Mass Index and Coexisting Prehypertension and Prediabetes among Rural Adults in Niger Delta Region, Nigeria

In total, 14% of participants with normal blood glucose, 19.6% pre-diabetes, 7.6% diabetes, 24% normotensive, 15.4% pre-hypertensive and 1.8% hypertensive coexisted with overweight. Pre-diabetes co-existed with 9.8% normotensive and pre-hypertensive, respectively, while cumulative diabetes was 0.2% normotensive, 5.6% pre-hypertensive, and 18.2% hypertensive. About 16.4 percent had both diabetes and obesity combined, and hypertension and obesity. In addition, 19.5 percent had hypertension, obesity and diabetes combined. The prevalence of obesity was 16.4 percent in total, 18.2 percent hypertension and 24.0 percent diabetes. 17.5 percent, 21.3 percent and 23.7 percent were the incidence of coexisting prehypertension and pre-diabetes, pre-non-communicable and primary non-communicable diseases. Positive and linear associations and statistically significant differences (p<0.001) in the varying degree of complex interaction between blood pressure and blood glucose as well as body mass index were found in the data analysis. In conclusion, nonetheless, this research offers population-based baseline evidence showing that the populations in the oil-bearing communities are at high risk of developing hypertension, diabetes, and obesity with a high prevalence of pre-hypertension and pre-diabetes combinations. In particular, the coexistence of a significantly high incidence of prehypertension and pre-diabetes with an elevated body mass index has a more adverse effect on progression to total hypertension and diabetes. For oil and gas-bearing populations, there is a need for a national program to eliminate, monitor or postpone the burden of risk factors for non-communicable diseases.

Author (s) Details

A. Nwafor
Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, P.M.B. 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

Dr. F. C. Mmom
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

Dr. O. Obia
Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, P.M.B. 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

Dr. C. Obiandu
Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, P.M.B. 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

V. O. Hart
Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, P.M.B. 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

Dr. B. C. Chinko
Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, P.M.B. 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

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