Monitoring the Effects of Processing, Storage Days and Storage Temperatures on Lipid Oxidation and Palatability of Processed Snail Meat Products

In this research, the impact of the processing methods, storage days (d) and storage temperatures on the lipid oxidation and palatability of snail meat products processed was carried out. Foods containing substantial amounts of fat, such as milk and meat products, oils, nuts, and also those containing only minor amounts of lipids, such as vegetable products, can cause lipid oxidation. Samples of snail meat products were regularly subjected to a 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) examination for Malonaldehyde(MA) with the water-TBA reagent as a blank at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 d. Trained panellists who analyzed the products based on color, taste, tenderness, juiciness and overall acceptance were served meat samples. The results showed that at 0-5, 10-20 and 25-30 d, the unseasoned-fried product had the lowest lipid oxidation values of 0.04, 0.13 and 0.19 mg malonaldehyde/kg meat in all storage periods. Lipid oxidation values were 0.2565, 0.3040 and 0.3548 for items stored for 10-20d. In freezer-stored goods, lipid oxidation values were lower than in refrigerated products at 0-20d. As storage days for all the goods increased, lipid oxidation values increased. Throughout the storage period, the seasoned smoke-dried item had lower lipid values than the seasoned fried product. The color regression curve was a= 5.282 and b= – 5.342, while the acceptability was a= 4.455, b= -3.438. This relationship implies that the values of TBA give a strong colour and acceptability estimate.

Practical applications: For evaluation, four different treatments have been considered; unseasoned fried (USF), seasoned fried (SF), seasoned oven-dried (SOD) and seasoned smoke-dried (SSD) and the products have been processed under three storage conditions (room, fridge and freezer). The regression relationships were evaluated between the values of TBA and the sensory attributes of the products (color and overall acceptance). Our findings indicate that the production of lipid oxidation in snail meat products is retarded by cold storage and proper packaging. Throughout the storage era, smoke-drying with seasonings had lower lipid oxidation values than the seasoned fried product. Smoke-drying and curing may prolong the shelf life of processed meat without detrimental effects on the quality and overall acceptance of meat.

Author (s) Details

Dr. I. Iwanegbe
Department of Food Technology, Auchi Polytechnic Auchi, Edo State, Nigeria.

J. O. Igene
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Benin, P.M.B. 1154, Benin City, Nigeria.

G. U. Emelue
Department of Forestry and Wildlife, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Benin, P.M.B. 1154, Benin City, Nigeria.

J. U. Obaroakpo
Department of Food Technology, Auchi Polytechnic Auchi, Edo State, Nigeria.

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