Pulsed Laser Welding between DP1000 Steel and Aluminum Alloy 1050

To join DP1000 steel and an aluminium alloy 1050 H111, a pulsed Nd: YAG laser was used to weld dissimilar metals. Since butt welding was nearly impossible due to the large thermal conductivity and melting temperature variations of these materials, two sheets of each metal with 30 14 1 mm3 were lap welded. The aim of this study was to determine the best laser welding parameters based on mechanical and microstructure analysis. As a result, the welded samples were tensile tested to determine the efficiency of the joining process. The best set of welding parameters was duplicated, and the welding joint created with these proper parameters was meticulously examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Despite the anticipated challenges of welding two different metals, high-quality welded joints were achieved. In addition, some samples performed admirably in mechanical testing, with tensile strengths comparable to those of the original 1050 aluminium alloy. The ability to join high-strength dual-phase steels with a gentle, ductile 1XXX aluminium alloy effectively opens up new design possibilities and demonstrates the flexibility of laser-type welding operations. The authors hope that this study will serve as a foundation for future research in this field.

Author (s) Details

António B. Pereira
TEMA–Centre for Mechanical Technology and Automation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.

Ana Cabrinha
TEMA–Centre for Mechanical Technology and Automation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.

Fábio Rocha
TEMA–Centre for Mechanical Technology and Automation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.

Pedro Marques
TEMA–Centre for Mechanical Technology and Automation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal and Industrial Engineering and Management, Universidade Lusófona, Campo Grande 376, 1749, Lisbon, Portugal.

Fábio A. O. Fernandes
TEMA–Centre for Mechanical Technology and Automation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.

Ricardo J. Alves de Sousa
TEMA–Centre for Mechanical Technology and Automation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.

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