Research on Sustainable Conversion of Agriculture and Food Waste into Activated Carbons Devoted to Fluoride Removal from Drinking Water in Senegal

The aim of this research was to look into the development of activated carbons (AC) from cashew shells and millet stalks, as well as their fluoride retention ability. Senegalese agricultural residues were collected. It is well known that certain Senegalese areas, known as the groundnut basin, suffer from a public health issue caused by an abundance of fluoride in the drinking water consumed by these people. No other chemical compounds were applied to the activated carbons, which were made by combining pyrolysis and activation with water steam. The activated carbonaceous materials collected from cashew shells and millet stalks, respectively, were dubbed CS-H2O and MS-H2O. CS-H2O and MS-H2O have excellent adsorbent properties, with current carbon content ranging from 71 to 86 percent. For CS-H2O and MS-H2O, the BET surface areas are 942 m2:g ⁻¹ and 1234 m2:g ⁻¹, respectively. Under the same conditions, a third activated carbon was made from food wastes and coagulation-flocculation sludge (FW/CFS-H2O). FW/CFS- H2O contains 32.6 and 39.3 percent carbon and calcium, respectively. With all of these activated carbons, kinetics sorption was done, and the pseudo-first equation was used to explain the kinetics sorption. The best activated carbon from kinetics sorption was used to conduct fluoride adsorption isotherms with synthetic and natural water. Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to explain the experimental results. In terms of equilibrium data, the Langmuir model better describes the experimental data than the Freundlich model. The results revealed that carbonaceous materials made from CS-H2O and MS-H2O were only marginally effective at removing fluoride. The adsorption potential of FW/CFS-H2O is 28.48 m2:g ⁻¹ with r2 = 0:99 as compared to synthetic water.

Author (s) Details

Mohamad M. Diémé
Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique des Matériaux, Université Assane Seck, BP 523, Ziguinchor, Sénégal.

Maxime Hervy
Ecole des Mines de Nantes, laboratoire GEPEA, UMR CNRS 6144, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes cedex 3, France.

Saïdou N. Diop
Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique des Matériaux, Université Assane Seck, BP 523, Ziguinchor, Sénégal.

Claire Gérente
Ecole des Mines de Nantes, laboratoire GEPEA, UMR CNRS 6144, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes cedex 3, France.

Audrey Villot
Ecole des Mines de Nantes, laboratoire GEPEA, UMR CNRS 6144, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes cedex 3, France.

Yves Andres
Ecole des Mines de Nantes, laboratoire GEPEA, UMR CNRS 6144, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes cedex 3, France.

Courfia K. Diawara
Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique des Matériaux, Université Assane Seck, BP 523, Ziguinchor, Sénégal.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/CPCS-V8/issue/view/43

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