Study on Performance and Emission Studies on Cashewnut Shell Liquid Bio-Oil Fuelled Diesel Engine with Acetone as Additive

Vegetable oils may be used as a partial or complete replacement for diesel fuel. We used Acetone as an additive in this study to look into the possibility of using higher percentages of bio-oil in diesel engines without any retrofitting. Pyrolysis was used to create bio-oil. The feed stroke for bio oil was cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL). B20 diesel fuel is a type of number 2 diesel fuel that contains 20% bio oil and 80% diesel fuel. In a single cylinder, four stroke direct injection diesel engine, the effects of Acetone, blended with B20 in 4, 8, 12 percent by volume, were tested. Performance tests were used to evaluate the effect of test fuels on engine torque, speed, brake specific fuel consumption, brake thermal efficiency, and exhaust gas temperature. Emission experiments were used to assess the impact of blends on CO, HC, NO, and smoke opacity. As compared to neat diesel service, HC emission was reduced by 34%, smoke density was reduced by 16%, and NO emission was reduced by 49.4 percent when the engine was powered by 12 percent Acetone with B20. CNSL can also be used as a diesel engine’s fuel. As a result, a combination of 20% CNSL bio oil and 12% acetone as an additive was found to be the best alternative fuel blend for diesel engines that did not require any engine modifications.

Author (s) Details

Dr. P. P. Shantharaman
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kings College of Engineering, Punalkulam-613303, Pudukkottai, Tamilnadu, India.

Dr. T. Pushparaj
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kings College of Engineering, Punalkulam-613303, Pudukkottai, Tamilnadu, India.

Dr. M. Prabhakar
Department of Mechanical Engineering, SRM TRP Engineering College, Irungalur-621105, Thiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu, India.

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