Asymptomatic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Women Delegates at a Christian Conference in Niger State, North Central, Nigeria: A Prospective Study

Background: The global HIV/AIDS outbreak has claimed the lives of an estimated 21.8 million people, with another 36.1 million infected. The most popular mode of transmission worldwide is sexual transmission. At the start of an outbreak, when prevalence in the general population is extremely low, the HIV virus is mostly found primarily in these subpopulations.

The aim of this study is to determine the HIV prevalence rate among the female delegates at the meeting, as well as the incidence rate by age group and occupational category.

Materials and Methods: Each subject had 2 mL of venous blood drawn and inoculated in a micro-container evacuated blood collection system with additives (K2EK2EDTA- Greiner bio-one USA). The serum samples were tested using Determine kit HIV 1 & 2 according to the manufacturer’s instructions, and the positive serum was confirmed with Uni-Gold. SPSS version 16.0 was used to code, calculate, and analyse the data, and p values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

Results: Our study found that 2.8 percent of the 327 women delegates between the ages of 16 and 65 in this population had HIV infections, which was statistically insignificant (p=0.837, mean value=4.91, median=5.00, S.D=2.03).

In relation to age, the age groups 26 – 30 years and 36 – 40 years had a higher proportion of (8.7%) and (4.2%) of HIV positive people, respectively. Housewives had the highest percentage of HIV positive people (9.5 percent), followed by civil servants (3.7 percent ).

Conclusion: The overall prevalence rate of HIV infections in this conference population of 2.8 percent is a major health concern. As a result, we advocate for sex education at all levels of our religious traditions, for both youth and adults; however, sex education should not be overly spiritualized in order to minimise the threat in our culture. In order to reduce the government’s financial burden, the private sector, such as non-governmental organisations, must also provide assistance.

Author (s) Details

Abayomi Rachel Olufunmilayo
Department of Medical Microbiology, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

Akobi Oliver Adeyemi
Department of Medical Microbiology, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

Olowosulu Ruth Omotayo
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

Igunnu Shola Anna
Department of Histopathology, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

Akanbiola Iyadunni Oluwabunmi
Department of Histopathology, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

Ogedengbe Sunday Oladokun
Department of Medical Microbiology, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

Akpata Amos Sunday Francis
Department of Chemical Pathology, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

Imhanrobobhor Erdman Amos
Department of Chemical Pathology, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

Akobi Evelyn Chimerenma
Department of Nursing, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

Abayomi Malomo Abiobun
Department of Nutrition and Diabetic, Federal Polytechnic, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

Uzoigwe Eunice Ogochukwu
Department of Medical Microbiology, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

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