Neurocysticercosis: Are the Criteria Diagnostic Enough?

Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a common Central Nervous System disease caused by helminths (the larval form of Taenia Solium) (CNS). It’s one of the most common causes of epilepsy worldwide. It’s also linked to high mortality, intracranial hypertension, and a loss of seizure control if it’s not treated aggressively. This chapter examines many cases of patients with secondary epilepsy that meet the diagnostic criteria for NCC and contrasts the diagnostic criteria in 2001 and 2016: one case with a definitive diagnosis and the others with a likely diagnosis. This is a common issue for people who live in areas where cysticercosis is prevalent, such as Mexico. The majority of patients had clinical and imaging findings that were strongly predictive of NCC, as well as positive ELISA tests for cysticerci in CSF. We stress the importance of ruling out the differential diagnosis, particularly in endemic areas, challenging the use of ELISA in CSF testing for cysticerci antibodies, and advising caution when interpreting cystic lesions as having a discernible scolex because possible mimics are common.

Author (s) Details

Ildefonso Rodriguez-Leyva
Department of Neurology Service, Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto”, Zona Universitaria, San Luis Potosí, México.

Alejandro Orozco-Narvaez
Department of Neurology Service, Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto”, Zona Universitaria, San Luis Potosí, México.

Adriana Patricia Martínez Mayorga
Department of Neurology Service, Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto”, Zona Universitaria, San Luis Potosí, México.

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