Determination of Anaerobic Microbial Influenced Corrosion of Oil Pipeline Steel Inhibitions with Manniphyton fulvum mull Leaves Ethanol Extract and Aqueous Extract

Corrosion is a blight on civilisation that is eating away at our metal world. The corrosion process is governed by well-known electrochemical and thermodynamic rules, as well as a slew of other factors that influence metal behaviour. Using gravimetric and media absorbance evaluation methodologies, anaerobic microbial influenced corrosion of oil pipeline steel inhibitions with Manniphyton fulvum mull leaves ethanol extract and aqueous extract, respectively. Desulphurvibro species, the test organism, was isolated from corroded pipeline steel immersed in crude oil and water mixture sample obtained from the Agip drilling site in Ahoda Porthacourt, Rivers state, Nigeria. For this project, postgate media was used. (each ethanol extract and aqueous extract) are lower than the blank medium’s absorbance result (without the extract). The drop in absorbance is thought to be due to the plant extract in the media inhibiting the growth of sulphate reducing bacteria (Desulphurvibro species), resulting in fewer bacteria that hinder the passage of light through the medium. The weight loss and corrosion rate of the pipeline steel in the plant extract containing media were lower than the weight loss and corrosion rate of the steel immersed in the blank medium, according to gravimetric results (without extract). In ethanol extract, be more vulnerable than in aqueous extract. Manniphyton fulvum mull extract inhibits microbial-influenced corrosion by inhibiting the growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria cells as well as adsorption of plant extract molecules on the metal surface, establishing a barrier between the metal and the invading bacteria. The plant extracts’ adsorption isotherms, both ethanol and aqueous, best fit the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The ethanol and aqueous extracts of Manniphyton fulvum mull leaves, respectively, suppressed the growth of sulphate reducing bacteria.

Author (s) Details

N. E. Ibisi
Department of Chemistry, College of Physical and Applied Sciences, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria.

E. A. Mbadinauwa
Department of Chemistry, College of Physical and Applied Sciences, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/NUPSR-V6/article/view/1304

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Previous post Microwave Plasma Assisted Sol-gel Technique for Synthesis of TiO2 Nanoparticles: A Recent Study
Next post Revivification of the Concept of Coexisting CDDW and DSC Orders for Bi2212