Phytotherapeutic Activities of Six Plant Infusions: Chemical Constituents and Antioxidant Activity

Traditional medicine is used for a variety of reasons, including cultural and economic factors as well as the ineffectiveness of many contemporary treatments. The absence of effective pharmaceutical formulations, as well as current antibiotic pathogen resistance and oxidative stress, have led to the development of new therapeutic compounds derived from plants. Several investigations have revealed that medicinal plants have antioxidant effects, owing to their phytochemical makeup. Furthermore, their antioxidant properties can prevent oxidative modification by neutralising free radicals, scavenging oxygen, or degrading peroxides. By countering oxidative stress and its related pathologies, endemic plants can be a source of new bioactive substances that can prevent diseases including cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and Alzheimer’s disease. Camellia sinensis, Melissa officinalis, Lippia citriodora, Cymbopogon citratus, Matricaria chamomilla, and Tilia cordata were studied for total phenolics, flavonoids, and caffeine concentration in six medicinal plants used traditionally in phytotherapy, usually ingested as tea or infusion. There were significant differences in total phenolics and flavonoids content among the plants studied, as well as depending on the extract type. Caffeine concentrations were also substantially different, with M. officinalis, T. cordata, C. citratus, M. chamomilla, L. citriodora, and C. sinensis following the sequence M. officinalis, T. cordata, C. citratus, M. chamomilla, L. citriodora, and C. sinensis. C. citratus (90.9%) > C. sinensis (87.8%) > M. officinalis (50.7%) > M. chamomilla (45.3%) > T. cordata (32.2%) > L. citriodora (32.2%) > M. chamomilla (45.3%) > M. chamomilla (45.3%) > M. chamomilla (45.3%) > M. chamomilla (45.3%) > M. chamomilla (4 (28.0 percent ).

Author (s) Details

Ana F. Vinha
FCS/UFP-Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Porto, Portugal and LAQV/REQUIMTE/Departamento de Ciências Químicas, Laboratório de Bromatologia, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.

Carla Sousa
FCS/UFP-Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Porto, Portugal.

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