Research on Gastric Ulcer Model in Mini-Pig

The mini-pig has been in high demand in the basic and clinical research fields due to its ease of handling, small size, and analytical and physiological similarities to humans. It has been used in numerous clinical studies to mimic a variety of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, bone abnormalities, skin infections, and gastrointestinal ailments. It has the potential to be the most useful animal model for studying gastrointestinal diseases such as gastric ulcers. Materials and Procedures: Sus scrofa female mini-pigs weighing around 30 kg were used in this experiment. After a week of acclimation, the animals were fasted for 48 hours with free access to drinking water, followed by an endoscopic intra-gastric acetic acid injection. Mini-pigs were divided into two groups. It has the potential to be the most useful animal model for studying gastrointestinal diseases such as gastric ulcers. Materials and Procedures: Sus scrofa female mini-pigs weighing around 30 kg were used in this experiment. After a week of acclimation, the animals were fasted for 48 hours with free access to drinking water, followed by an endoscopic intra-gastric acetic acid injection. Mini-pigs were divided into two groups. two groups of two mini-pigs each Endoscopy was used to investigate the process of gastric ulcer development at the time of injection, on the 7th and 14th days. An autopsy was performed 14 days after the drug injection, followed by a stomach tissue analysis. Gastric ulcer was successfully induced in mini-pig animals, with clearly visible signs of necrosis, inflammation, and mineralization. Famotidine’s therapeutic properties were demonstrated when illness symptoms were significantly reduced. Conclusion: We discovered that mini-pigs, which have a high resemblance to humans, can be an effective and practical species for inducing gastric ulcers and can be used in a variety of preclinical research. The use of animal models in the study of digestive diseases is critical for understanding the pathogenesis of these disorders and testing new therapies.

Author(s) Details

Woon Kyu Lee
Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon, South Korea.

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