Study on Adipocytes as Sensors of Lipid Transport through Caco-2/HT29-MTX Intestinal Barrier Rescued from Cancer Phenotype by Oleic Acid

Nutrients and many medications enter the body through the gastrointestinal epithelium, which is a one-of-a-kind route. The goal of this work was to see if co-culturing two colon cancer cell lines, HT29-MTX mucus-producing cells and Caco-2 enterocyte-like cells, improved differentiation into a functioning in vitro intestinal barrier model. Real-time studies, immunochemistry, and gene expression analysis on Caco-2 vs co-cultures of Caco-2 and HT29-MTX (10%) cells were used to validate the findings. The partial preservation of cancer-cell phenotype in differentiated Caco-2 cells was confirmed, and fatty acids were grouped together as putative cancer signalling regulators. HT29-MTX cells caused morphological changes in Caco-2 cells, increased their proliferation rate slightly, and significantly altered gene transcription of phenotype markers, fatty acid receptors, intracellular transporters, and lipid droplet components, as well as their functional responses to oleic acid. In vitro, co-culture of cancer cells with goblet cells partially restored enterocyte phenotype, which was completed by oleic acid interaction with cancer cell signalling pathways. The lipid transport of a rebuilt gastrointestinal epithelium was studied. The ability of adipose tissue to regulate lipemia is strongly reliant on nutrition absorption in the intestine. adipocytes as lipid sensors for absorption The rebuilt intestinal barrier was pre-absorbed with oleic acid (OA). With partially differentiated 3T3L1-MBX adipocytes detecting up to 5 M OA in solution or 40 M OA pre-absorbed by Caco2/HT29-MTX intestinal barriers, optimised experimental conditions for co-culture with intestinal barriers were obtained. The ability to accumulate TG in adipocytes was substantially impacted by metabolism, particularly glycemia and insulinemia. The current study shows that Caco2/HT29-MTX intestinal barriers operate substantially better for fatty acid uptake and release than Caco-2 intestinal barriers. These findings, taken collectively, open up new avenues for research.

Author (S) Details

Emmanuelle Berger
University of Lyon, UMR Ecologie Microbienne Lyon (LEM), CNRS 5557, INRAE 1418, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, VetAgro Sup, Research Team “Bacterial Opportunistic Pathogens and Environment” (BPOE), 69622 Villeurbanne, France.

Research Director, Alain Géloën
University of Lyon, UMR Ecologie Microbienne Lyon (LEM), CNRS 5557, INRAE 1418, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, VetAgro Sup, Research Team “Bacterial Opportunistic Pathogens and Environment” (BPOE), 69622 Villeurbanne, France.

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