Current Advanced Studies on Adenomyoma of the Small Intestine

Adenomyoma of the gastrointestinal system is a rare benign tumor-like condition. The small intestine is the second most common place, with the lesion most commonly occurring in the periampullary region, however it can also occur in the jejunum and ileum. While adult patients are most usually diagnosed with Vaterian adenomyoma, children account for more than half of all known cases of jejunal and ileal adenomyoma. Periampullary adenomyoma causes biliary blockage or abdominal pain, whereas jejunal and ileal adenomyoma causes intussusception or is discovered unintentionally during surgery or autopsy. Because endoscopic and radiographic tests yield non-specific results, histopathological analysis is crucial in adenomyoma identification. Adenomyoma is a pathological disease in which interlacing smooth muscle bundles surround glandular structures of various sizes. Adenomyoma is hypothesised to develop from either a type of hamartoma or a pancreatic heterotopia. Despite the fact that restricted resection is the best treatment option, pancreaticoduodenectomy is frequently performed when a lesion develops in the periampullary region as a result of a preoperative misdiagnosis as a cancer. As a result, physicians and pathologists must stay current on the illness in order to avoid making inaccurate diagnosis that lead to unnecessary surgery. Despite the fact that restricted resection is the best treatment option, pancreaticoduodenectomy is frequently performed when a lesion develops in the periampullary region as a result of a preoperative misdiagnosis as a cancer. As a result, physicians and pathologists must stay current on the illness in order to avoid making inaccurate diagnosis that lead to unnecessary surgery.

Author (s) Details

Yoshihisa Takahashi
Department of Pathology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605, Japan.

Toshio Fukusato
Department of Pathology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605, Japan.

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