Recent Advances in Dermatology Using DNA Aptamer “Aptamin C” Innovation: Oxidative Stress Prevention and Effect Maximization of Vitamin C through Antioxidation

Vitamin C (also known as L-ascorbic acid) plays a key function in decreasing Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and boosting cell regeneration by shielding cells from oxidative stress. Despite the fact that Vitamin C is widely used in the beauty and pharmaceutical industries, there is evidence that it is easily oxidised when kept by air, pH, temperature, and UV light [1, 2]. Vitamin C insufficiency reduces the antioxidant activity of the vitamin and reduces the shelf life of items containing Vitamin C. To tackle vitamin C insufficiency, we developed Aptamin C, a ground-breaking DNA aptamer that boosts vitamin C’s antioxidant effect by binding to the reduced form and delaying oxidation.

The Binding of Aptamin C to Vitamin C was determined using ITC analysis. In an ITC experiment, 0.2 mM Vitamin C was given 25 times in 2laliquots into a 1.8 ml sample cell containing Aptamin C at a concentration of 0.02 mM. The data were fitted to a one-site binding isotherm using the origin programme for ITC v.5.0.

The effects of Aptamin C and the Vitamin C complex on human skin were studied in vitro and in clinical trials. We noticed that a combination of Aptamin C and Vitamin C was very effective at reducing wrinkles, lightening the skin, and increasing moisture levels. Participants in a clinical trial experienced a significant reduction in skin irritation and itching after being given the chemical.

Conclusion: These data show that Aptamin C, a novel and revolutionary chemical, could be an important cosmeceutical therapy for a variety of skin problems.

Author (S) Details

Sooho Choi
Nexmos, Inc., 2207 U-Tower, 767, Sinsu-ro, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

Jeongmin Han
Structural Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, College of life Sciences & Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea.

Ji Hyun Kim
Nexmos, Inc., 2207 U-Tower, 767, Sinsu-ro, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

A-Ru Kim
Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea.

Sang-Heon Kim
Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea.

Weontae Lee
Structural Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, College of life Sciences & Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea.

Moon-Young Yoon
Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea.

Gyuyoup Kim
Nexmos, Inc., 2207 U-Tower, 767, Sinsu-ro, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

Yoon-Seong Kim
Nexmos, Inc., 2207 U-Tower, 767, Sinsu-ro, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

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