The Influence of Wind Velocity and Wind Distribution on the Double Skin Façades with Different Width Corridors in DSF Cavities

The building facade is critical to achieving thermal comfort and energy conservation. A Double Skin Facade (DSF) is a two-layer envelope system with an external and internal layer that contains a buffer space for controlled ventilation and solar protection. Transparency and the use of glass have become appealing facade options in architectural design as a result of technological advances. Glass facades on buildings can provide outdoor views, an abundance of natural light, and the potential for natural ventilation. Double skin façades (DSF) are architectural elements that are becoming more popular in modern buildings. They were created as an alternative technology. to improve the thermal performance of conventional fully glazed buildings. Also they have been widely used as a way to reduce the thermal instability of inner spaces caused by the growing use of large glazed areas in buildings. This concept has provided the possibility of improved sound insulation, preheating air for ventilation, and protection of solar shading in urban areas. DSF’s can achieve reduction of winter heating requirements. However, when the building is under summer conditions or located in moderate or hot climates, heat gains are predominant and the cost of cooling becomes a major issue. The improvement of the system is necessary when working under hot climatic conditions. This is especially true when the façade must function in either extreme or moderate summer conditions. The thermal overheating characteristics of a specific type of DSF in various configurations, as well as their practical control, have not been subjected to systematic experimental and computational investigations. Previous research suggested that using ventilated facades contributes to energy savings from indoor thermal gains. The use of a ventilated channel lowers temperatures in the facade, but indoor thermal conditions must be evaluated in relation to this. as part of the system’s compliance with building requirements, to the facade configuration The majority of the research on a facade and energy-comfort modeling combination is limited to a single DSF typology. This study attempts to assess the indoor thermal comfort of a mechanically ventilated building with a DSF configuration. The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of wind velocity and wind distribution on mechanically ventilated buildings with DSF configurations, in order to determine whether a DSF configuration will provide better thermal comfort through natural ventilation. Another goal of this research is to look into the performance of a new DSF configuration for a -as part of the system’s compliance with building requirements, to the facade configuration The majority of the research on a facade and energy-comfort modeling combination is limited to a single DSF typology. This study attempts to assess the indoor thermal comfort of a mechanically ventilated building with a DSF configuration. The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of wind velocity and wind distribution on mechanically ventilated buildings with DSF configurations, in order to determine whether a DSF configuration will provide better thermal comfort through natural ventilation. Another goal of this research is to look into the performance of a new DSF configuration for a -The thermal comfort statuses of different width corridors with double skin facades were analyzed using the CFD program in this study. To investigate the thermal comfort inside the building, the thermal comfort indices, PMV and PPD values, were calculated in both FloEFD and Design Builder.

Author (S) Details

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Enes Yasa
Department of Int. Architecture, Faculty of Architecture, Istanbul University, Beyazid, Fatih, Istanbul, Turkey.

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