Study on Gynaecological Malignant Tumours at a University Teaching Hospital in Imo State South-Eastern Nigeria

Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) are common among people of all ages. Infections of the respiratory system in children cause a lot of morbidity and mortality. It is a major health issue in India as well. Pneumonia kills 2 million children under the age of five, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The majority of ARTIs are caused by viruses. The principal causative agents include rhinoviruses, respiratory syncytial viruses, parainfluenza and influenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, and adenoviruses. ARTIs are caused by bacteria such as group A streptococci, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Neisseria meningitides, Haemophilus influenzae, pneumococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Drug utilisation studies aid in determining the pattern of prescriptions for distinct illnesses in a given location. Our goal was to investigate medicine prescribing patterns and assess their rationale in children aged 1 to 5 years with acute respiratory tract infection.

We looked at 298 medications that were given to these kids. These prescriptions were analysed, and they were compared to WHO prescription indicators. Cough (96 percent), fever (93 percent), and rhinitis (82.5 percent) were the most prevalent symptoms, but sore throat, earache, and shortness of breath were also seen in these kids. The average number of medicines prescribed per patient was 4.1. Antipyretics were prescribed 98.3% of the time, antimicrobials 91.3 percent of the time, antihistaminics and cough syrups 75.2 percent of the time, Leukotriene antagonists 25.1 percent of the time, Vitamin B complex 11% of the time, and glucocorticoids 4.6 percent of the time. All of the medications were prescribed using brand names rather than generic names. 97.3 percent of the pharmaceuticals prescribed came from the national list of essential medications. In our research, we discovered an over use of antimicrobials. Antimicrobials must be used responsibly, which necessitates educational programmes. At the same time, parents should be made aware of the dangers of antibiotic use.

Author (S) Details

Sujata Jadhav
Department of Pharmacology, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad, Maharashtra, India.

Chitra Khanwelkar
Department of Pharmacology, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad, Maharashtra, India.

Abhay Jadhav
Department of Pharmacology, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad, Maharashtra, India.

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