Evaluation of ELISA and Microscopy to Diagnose Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Patients of Pediatric Age Group: A Comparative Approach

Background: Intestinal parasite infections (IPIs) are a serious public health concern in most regions of the world, particularly in developing and underdeveloped nations. Parasites such as Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Ascaris lumbricoides, and hookworm are frequent. The goal of the study was to assess the number of IPIs in paediatric patients and compare the results of ELISA and microscopy for Giardia.

Materials and methods: Between August 2017 and July 2018, 200 patients in the paediatric age range with the provided inclusion criterion ia had their stools sampled. For Giardia, microscopy, formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique, and ELISA were used.

The prevalence of intestinal parasite infections was determined to be 28 percent in our study. Giardia lamblia was determined to be the most frequent pathogenic parasite (19.5%), followed by Entamoeba histolytica (4.5 percent ). In our study, stool samples that were microscopically positive had formalin ethyl acetate concentrations of 8% and 15%, respectively. When compared to the Formalin ethyl acetate concentration method and Microscopy, ELISA and Rapid kit tests were found to detect a higher proportion of Giardia (Saline and Iodine mount).

In our investigation, the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections was found to be 28%. Giardia lamblia was the most frequent parasite, followed by Entamoeba histolytica. Parasitic infections were shown to be frequent among patients from low-income families, according to the study. Patients who did not wash their hands with soap and water before eating or after visiting the restroom were at higher risk.

Author (S) Details

Chand Nigam
Department of Microbiology, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Gopa Banerjee
Department of Microbiology, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Prashant Gupta
Department of Microbiology, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Vimala Venkatesh
Department of Microbiology, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

K. Verma
Department of Microbiology, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Shalini Tripathi
Department of Microbiology, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

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