Determining the Factors Associated with Prognosis of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a condition that occurs at the intersection of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and liver failure. Metformin’s role in individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has been explored in recent studies. This finding hasn’t been looked into on a global basis, nor has it been looked into in diverse ethnic groups.

The goal of this study is to determine the risk variables related with the prognosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in a cohort of patients in Palestine’s southern West Bank.

Methods: A retrospective cohort research included 300 NAFLD patients who visited the Hebron Governmental Hospital’s internal medicine department between October 2017 and September 2018. This study included 233 patients who had been diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Patients’ profiles were combed through for recent lab test results, comorbidity, and medication history. SPSS V20 was used to analyse the data. The non-alcoholic fatty liver disease fibrosis score calculator was used to calculate the liver fibrosis score.

The study included 230 non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients (58.6% of whom were females) with an average age of 54.78 (12.27) years. Nearly 65.5 percent of these individuals have a BMI of more over 30 kg/m2. When compared to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease individuals who are not diabetic, 62.25 percent of the 58 diabetes patients in this study had a liver fibrosis score > 0.676. Diabetes and fibrosis score had a statistically significant link (=0.000). There was also a significant link between hyperlipidemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients’ fibrosis score (=0.023), as well as a significant relationship between fibrosis score and hypertension (=0.000). In the same study, there was a significant association between NAFLD patients on statin therapy and those who were not on statin therapy, with a value of 0.015. Metformin did not appear to have a significant association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients who used it and those who did not.

Conclusion: Diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and statin use were all linked to a poor prognosis for NAFLD. All NAFLD patients must maintain strict hypertension and dyslipidemia management.

Author(S) Details

Muamar M. A. Shaheen
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Hebron University, Hebron, P.O. Box 40, Palestine.

Mohanad Saleh
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Hebron University, Hebron, P.O. Box 40, Palestine and Respiratory Department and Attending Internist at Intensive Care Unit Respiratory Department, Al-Ahli Hospital, Hebron, Palestine.

Deema Sider
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Hebron University, Hebron, P.O. Box 40, Palestine.

Reem A. l. Natsheh
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Hebron University, Hebron, P.O. Box 40, Palestine.

Raghad Dweik
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Hebron University, Hebron, P.O. Box 40, Palestine.

View Book:- https://stm.bookpi.org/RDMMR-V10/article/view/4641

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *