Effect of Biochar on Soil CO2 Fluxes from Agricultural Field Experiments in Russian Far East: A Recent Study

Agricultural soils emit a significant amount of greenhouse gases. Biochar is a soil improver that sequesters carbon when applied to the soil. Biochar has a low rate of decomposition compared to the initial biomass, allowing for a longer residence time in the soil than other organic supplements. Varied combinations of soil and meteorological conditions, as well as biochar, provide different research outcomes. The goal of our study was to determine the effects of applying 1 kg/m2 and 3 kg/m2 biochar to clay soils on CO2 flow in field tests across two cropping seasons in the Russian Far East. Biochar significantly reduces the cumulative flow of soil CO2 when compared to untreated field plots, according to the data. In the 2018 season, the application of 3 kg/m2 of biochar resulted in the largest reduction in soil CO2 emissions (28.2%), whereas the application of 1 kg/m2 resulted in the greatest reduction in cumulative CO2 flow (57.7%) in 2019. During the 2018 growing season, there was a correlation between a drop in the value of the cumulative CO2 flow and an increase in the biomass grown in the examined areas of agricultural crops.

Author(S) Details

M. A. Bovsun
Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian and Far Eastern Climat Smart Lab, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian and Il’ichev Pacific Oceanological Institute, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 43 Baltiyskaya st., 690041, Vladivostok, Russian Federation, Russian.

S. Castaldi
Far Eastern Climat Smart Lab, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian and University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Abramo Lincoln St.5, 81100, Caserta, Italy.

O. V. Nesterova
Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian and Far Eastern Climat Smart Lab, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian.

V. A. Semal
Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian and Far Eastern Climat Smart Lab, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian and Federal Scientific Center of the East Asia Terrestrial Biodiversity, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 159 Prospekt Stoletiya Vladivostoka Ave., Vladivostok 690022, Russian Federation, Russian.

N. A. Sakara
Primorskaya Vegetable Experimental Station of the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Vegetables, 57/1 Kubanskaya St, Artyom, 692779, Russian Federation, Russian.

A. V. Brikmans
Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian and Far Eastern Climat Smart Lab, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian.

A. I. Khoklova
Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian and Far Eastern Climat Smart Lab, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian.

T. Y. Karpenko
Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova St., Vladivostok 690090, Russian Federation, Russian and Institute of Chemistry, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 159 Prospekt Stoletiya Vladivostoka Ave., Vladivostok 690022, Russian Federation, Russian.

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