Analysing the Concept of Derogation in Regional and Continental Integration: A Case of Zimbabwe

Africa, like any other continent, has embraced continental integration in order to produce economies of scale and achieve long-term economic growth and development. Resource pooling, collaborative capacity building, complementary resource endowment management, and internal markets will all help to build a healthy African economy capable of overcoming poverty, unemployment, and social hardship.

The founding nationalists’ African development architecture ignores the concept of developing continental collective capacity for shared economic performance, improved and simplified movement of people and goods, development of common regional infrastructure, and promotion of a conducive macroeconomic environment facilitating economic development among African states.

Pan-African institutions’ new recognition that broader intra-Africa collaboration is viable beyond problems of continental peace and security to engendering macroeconomic convergence is a shift from the customary rhetoric of state sovereignty. According to studies, trade accounts for 80 cents of every dollar made in Africa. The realisation that continental integration remains a viable option arose in the context of efforts to ram through previous multilateral agreements with Africa, particularly in the area of raw material commerce. The creation of African regional trade blocs has progressed, albeit with intrinsic limits mostly driven by turfism, historical colonial attachments, a leadership shortage, and general institutional shortcomings in member states. The widespread failure of rules-based economic engagements in Africa, on the other hand, is a major source of concern, as it undermines Africa’s tremendous potential for increasing intra-African trade.

This study will examine and analyse the notion of derogation in integration, putting Zimbabwe’s derogation experiences in SADC, COMESA, and the CFTA in context, as well as comparing and contrasting situations from other continents. Derogation, by its very nature, has an adverse effect on the country requesting the derogation and stymies progress with the group dedicated to the goal of economic cooperation. Zimbabwe falls into the same category, putting other nations in a position to use reciprocity to mitigate the effects of faulty domestic economic policies.

Author(S) Details

Oswell Binha
College of Business Peace Leadership and Governance Institute of Peace, Leadership and Governance Course in Global Governance and Integration, Africa University, Zimbabwe.

Kudzanai Mwakurudza
College of Business Peace Leadership and Governance Institute of Peace, Leadership and Governance Course in Global Governance and Integration, Africa University, Zimbabwe.

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