Determination of Improved Efficacy and Stability of Silymarin Loaded Nanocochleates Over Liposomes for the Treatment of Skin Diseases

Aim: The anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and membrane-stabilizing properties of silymarin, a complex polyphenolic component mixture, are being studied in a variety of dermatological disorders. The goal of this study is to see if silymarin-loaded nanocochleates and liposomal topical treatment can help with chronic skin conditions.

The purpose of this study was to create and assess Silymarin-loaded liposomes, as well as to optimise the process. Conversion of these liposomes into nanocochleates for better drug entrapment, antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity against HaCaT cell lines, and short-term stability investigations.

Design Expert software was used to develop and optimise silymarin-loaded liposomes and nanocochleates. To compare their performance, different invitro and exvivo experiments were used.

Methodology: Liposomes were created by injecting ethanol into them, then trapping them with calcium chloride to form nanocochleates. Nanocochleates were optimised using a design of experiments (32 Factorial Design). To compare efficacy and stability, cell line experiments (HaCaT cell lines) and short-term stability tests were conducted.

Results: Nanocochleates outperformed liposomes in terms of particle size, entrapment efficiency, and drug deposition in Wistar Rat Skin, demonstrating their superiority. Both carriers maintained silymarin release for 24 hours. Nanocochleates had a considerable antimicrobial activity against E.coli and S.aureus. The superiority of nanocochleates over liposomes was established by their ability to inhibit excessive proliferation of HaCaT cell lines (a crucial mechanism by which most antipsoriatic medications work). Nanocochleates also had superior stability than liposomes, owing to lower drug entrapment efficacy and leakage.

Conclusion: Nanocochleates containing silymarin could be an effective topical drug delivery technology for chronic skin conditions such as psoriasis.

Author(S) Details

Rukhsana Rub
Department of Pharmacognosy, STES’s Smt. Kashibai Navale College of Pharmacy, Kondhwa(Bk), Affiliated to Savitribai Phule Pune University,Pune-411048, India.

Neha Munot
Department of Pharmaceutics, STES’s Smt. Kashibai Navale College of Pharmacy, Kondhwa (Bk), Affiliated to Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune-411048, India.

Akshay Wadate
Department of Pharmaceutics, STES’s Smt. Kashibai Navale College of Pharmacy, Kondhwa (Bk), Affiliated to Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune-411048, India.

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