Phenotypic Characterization of Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Accessions Conserved at the Genetic Resources and Biotechnology Institute: Experimental Investigation

The researchers wanted to see how different ten accessions from Zimbabwe’s Genetic Resources and Biotechnology Institute (GRBI) differed in terms of qualitative and quantitative characteristics. The accessions were planted in three replicates in a Randomized Complete Block Design. To collect qualitative and quantitative traits, the International Board for Plant Genetic Resources (IBPGR) developed the common bean descriptor list. With Hierarchical Cluster Analysis Minitab Release 12.22 and GenStat Discovery 14 software, the quantitative data for the number of days to 50% flowering, plant height, days to maturity, seed size, grain production, and number of seeds per pod were evaluated. Cluster analysis divided genotypes into two primary groups when the dendrogram was partitioned at the 26:22 percent similarity levels. Cluster A had two bean genotypes, whereas Cluster B contained eight genotypes separated into two subgroups. Depending on genotype pairs, groupings, and sub-groups, the genetic closeness of accessions varied substantially. Accessions from different clusters (A and B) had lesser genetic closeness, whereas accessions from the same cluster had higher genetic similarity. There were significant differences (P0.01) in the number of pods per plant, the number of seeds per pod, length, and seed size across the accessions. Based on diverse morphological traits presented by different accessions, it is feasible to determine that morphological variety exists among the 10 common bean accessions. It’s also possible to conclude that there are no duplicates among the ten most common bean accessions.

Author(S) Details

Rudo Musango
Department of Research and Specialist Services, Genetic Resources and Biotechnology Institute, P.O Box CY 550, Causeways, Harare, Zimbabwe.

Kusena Kudzai
Department of Research and Specialist Services, Genetic Resources and Biotechnology Institute, P.O Box CY 550, Causeways, Harare, Zimbabwe.

Summerset Mhungu
Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Horticulture, Women’s University in Africa, Education services Centre, Harare, Zimbabwe.

Handsen Tibugari
Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Horticulture, Women’s University in Africa, Education services Centre, Harare, Zimbabwe.

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