Assessment of Postharvest Management of Frafra Potato (Solenostemon rotundifolius (Poir.) J. K. Morton)

The Frafra potato (Solenostemon rotundifolius (Poir.) J.K. Morton) is an underutilised tuber crop grown in Ghana, Nigeria, Benin, Togo, Burkina Faso, and Mali’s interior Savanna areas. When compared to other tuber crops, the crop has agronomic advantages in low soils and yield advantages with limited production inputs. The study focuses on the crop’s most important integrated agricultural production and postharvest management strategies. The focus was on existing and prospective areas to improve postharvest quality and shelf-life, which is still a relatively new subject. Due to their high moisture content, vulnerability to physical damage, and high metabolic activity, tubers, like other root and tuber crops, suffer significant postharvest losses (PHL). Primary physio-chemical deterioration (such as weight loss, respiration, compositional alterations, and sprouting) and decay induced by microbial invasion and physiological problems are the main causes of PHL. PHL losses result in a drop in quantity and quality, as well as price reductions. The extent of PHL in Frafra potato and crop-specific postharvest management approaches are both unknown. PHL, on the other hand, may fall within the global estimate of 30 to 60% across root and tuber crops. To reduce PHL, integrated crop management strategies like as variety selection, planting material quality, soil fertility management, field pest and disease control, excellent harvesting and handling practises, suitable storage, and postharvest treatments must all be taken into account. This chapter includes background knowledge and key technology for effective Frafra potato postharvest management. Access to enhanced storage and processing technology can certainly boost production to commercial levels. As more study information and recommendations are developed in future studies, such bits of information can be updated.

Author(S) Details

Issah Sugri
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

Francis Kusi
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana

Julius Yirzagla
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana

Mutari Abubakari
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

Salim Lamini
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

Peter Anabire Asungre
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

Mukhtaru Zakaria
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

Patrick Attamah
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

John Mburi Azasiba
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

Emmanuel A. Aziiba
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

Roger A. L. Kanton
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

Stephen K. Nutsugah
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

Samuel S. J. Buah
CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Box 46, Bawku, UER, Ghana.

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