Nutritional, Physicochemical and Sensory Characterizations of Six Sorts of Probiotic Yogurts Developed With Milk and Cereal Grains (Maize, Millet and Sorghum) in Benin

Fermented beverages are popular in Benin and many other African countries. The study’s major goal is to assess the nutritional, physicochemical, and sensory qualities of two types of probiotic yoghurts made with milk and cereal grains (maize, millet and sorghum). The two sorts of beverages were made using two separate methods and consisted of six distinct types of yoghurt (akpan yogurt, likpan yogurt, abokpan yogurt, gowe yogurt, litin yoghurt and abotin yogurt). The diverse fermented foods were subjected to physicochemical, nutritional, and sensory examinations. The physicochemical and nutritional analyses revealed that each of the six beverages included iron (3.7 to 22.8 mg/100 g), protein (14.3 to 19.0 percent), total carbohydrates (5.5 to 10.9 percent), and a pH of 4.1 to 4.2. Vitamins A, B1, B2, and C were found in every produced meal. Vitamin K1 was only found in the litin yoghurt (30.3 mg/100 g), while vitamin E was only found in the akpan and likpan yoghurts (3.3 mg/100 g and 7.1 mg/100 g, respectively). Vitamin A, B1, B2, and C levels were higher in foods made from fermented cereal pastes (maize, millet, or sorghum) than in other varieties. Statistical studies found that the three types of yoghurt in each category had a significant difference (p0.05). The sensory analysis revealed that the panellists of the tasting approved of all of the made fermented beverages. These many foods created play an essential role in terms of health due to their nutritional makeup and are advised for individuals of all ages, particularly the most susceptible population such as pregnant women, children, and the elderly who are frequently malnourished.

Author(S) Details

Tchekessi C. K. Célestin
Food Health Safety Research Unit (URSSA), Laboratory of Microbiology and Food Technology (LA. MI. T. A), Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Sciences and Techniques (FAST), University of Abomey-Calavi (UAC), 04BP 888 Cotonou, Benin.

Azokpota Paulin
Laboratory of Food Sciences (LSA), Faculty of Agronomic Sciences (FSA), University of Abomey-Calavi (UAC), 03 BP 2819 Jéricho, Cotonou, Benin.

Agbangla Clément
Laboratory of Genetics and Biotechnology, Faculty of Sciences and Techniques (FAST), University of Abomey-Calavi (UAC), Abomey-Calavi, Benin.

Bokossa Yaou P. Innocent
Food Health Safety Research Unit (URSSA), Laboratory of Microbiology and Food Technology (LA. MI. T. A), Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Sciences and Techniques (FAST), University of Abomey-Calavi (UAC), 04BP 888 Cotonou, Benin.

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