Effects of a Medical Approach Involving Periodic Intervention: An Approach towards Anxiety and Mood among Ballet Dancers

Ballet dancers who are nervous before a public performance are more likely to get an injury. This study looked at the relationship between psychological factors and a medical approach to injury prevention for teenage ballet dancers in Japan.

Based on the stress-injury paradigm in sports, we conducted a prospective research of psychological variables and injury. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) was administered to 44 outstanding teenage ballet dancers (41 girls, 3 men, age range 18.0-21.2 years) once every two weeks for around a year. The year was divided into three parts based on performance contests. The first term covered the first half of the intervention, while the second term covered the second half after a break for summer vacation. The third term represented the suspension of the intervention and the second half of the intervention. Data from 21 females were compared and studied in three groups: high (H), medium (M), and low (L) state and trait anxiety.

Throughout the period, there were no significant differences in tension and confusion between H and L State groups, but there were large disparities in tension and confusion between H and L State groups during critical events. The Trait and State groups were significantly different on all mood measurements before a public performance during the intervention interruption period. The overall number of injuries reduced as well. As a result, in order to control performance anxiety and avoid harm, a medical strategy with a periodic potential relationship is beneficial. In the next years, In the future, amateur Japanese dancers will benefit from psychological counselling and medical treatment during their hectic performance schedule. We want to increase and continue the support offered to the participants as a result of this research.

Author(S) Details

Kanaka Yatabe
Department of Sports Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Japan.

Kohei Ashikaga
Department of Sports Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Japan.

Ryota Muroi
Department of Sports Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Japan.

Naoko Yui
Department of Sports Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Japan.

Satomi Kasuya
Center for the University-wide Curriculum University, Rikkyo University, Japan.

Rumiko Inoue
Department of Sports Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Japan.

Shu Somemura
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Japan.

Fumiko Terawaki
Department of Sports Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Japan.

Hisao Miyano
Department of Research Division, National Center for University Entrance Examinations, Japan

Hiroto Fujiya
Department of Sports Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Japan.

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