Evaluating the Effects of 24-Week Intervention with High-Concentration Hydrogen-Rich Water on Body Composition, Blood Lipid Profiles and Inflammation Biomarkers in Individuals with Metabolic Syndrome

The researchers want to see how HRW affects blood lipids, inflammation, oxidative stress, and glucose levels, as well as phenotypic alterations like body mass and waist-to-hip ratio. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been shown to alleviate chronic inflammation, minimise oxidative stress, and enhance cellular function. Although preclinical and clinical research have demonstrated that H2-rich water (HRW) has promise benefits on particular characteristics of metabolic syndrome, the effects of long-term, high-concentration HRW in this common illness are still unknown. In 60 men and women with metabolic syndrome, we performed a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled experiment. After a one-week observation phase to obtain baseline clinical data, participants were randomly assigned to either placebo or high-concentration HRW (> 5.5 millimoles of H2 per day) over a 24-week period. Supplementing your diet  In comparison to placebo, high-concentration HRW lowered blood cholesterol and glucose levels, decreased serum haemoglobin A1c, and enhanced indicators of inflammation and redox homeostasis (P 0.05). Furthermore, H2 caused a small decrease in BMI and waist-to-hip ratio. Our data support the notion that high-concentration HRW might be a useful therapy for lowering metabolic syndrome risk variables.

Author(S) Details

Tyler W. LeBaron
Centre of Experimental Medicine, Institute for Heart Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovak Republic and Molecular Hydrogen Institute, Enoch, Utah, USA.

Ram B. Singh
Hospital and Research Institute, Moradabad, India.

Ghizal Fatima
Era Medical College, Lucknow, India.

Kumar Kartikey
Hospital and Research Institute, Moradabad, India.

Jai P. Sharma
Hospital and Research Institute, Moradabad, India.

Sergej M. Ostojic
Applied Bioenergetics Lab, Faculty of Sport and PE, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.

Anna Gvozdjakova
Comenius University Bratislava, Medical Faculty, Pharmacobiochemical Laboratory of 3rd Medical Department, Bratislava, Slovakia.

Branislav Kura
Molecular Hydrogen Institute, Enoch, Utah, USA.

Mami Noda
Laboratory of Pathophysiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Viliam Mojto
Third Internal Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia.

Mohammad Arif Niaz
Center of Nutrition Research, International College of Nutrition, Moradabad, India.

Jan Slezak
Centre of Experimental Medicine, Institute for Heart Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovak Republic.

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