Evaluating the Association of TORCH Infection with Bad Obstetric History among Pregnant Women in India

Congenital infections are those that can spread from the mother to the foetus in gestation and have major consequences for the developing foetus. These illnesses are referred to as TORCH infections because they involve toxoplasma, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and types 1 and 2 of the herpes simplex virus. Early prenatal diagnosis and appropriate care help avoid congenital infections.

This study’s objective was to assess the relationship between TORCH infection and a poor obstetric history in pregnant women. This research involves observation and comparison.

Between April 2020 and September 2021, this study was carried out in the Central Laboratory Section of the Department of Microbiology, SMS Medical College and Attached Group of Hospitals, Jaipur (Rajasthan).

260 pregnant women had blood samples collected (130 with a negative obstetric history and 130 without a negative obstetric history). In addition to ELISA for Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, chemiluminescence was utilised to identify IgM and IgG antibodies against Toxoplasma, Rubella, and Cytomegalovirus.

According to the study’s findings, 17.19% of high-risk pregnant women had overall TORCH IgM seropositivity. IgM seropositivity for Toxoplasma gondii was 3.84 percent (P value.02), rubella was 2.34 percent (P value.30), cytomegalovirus was 5.47 percent (P value.08), and herpes-1 and 2 infections were 6.25 percent (P value.56) in pregnant women with a poor obstetric history. IgG seropositivity for toxoplasma, rubella, cytomegal (P value .11), 48.44% (P value.53), and 98.44% (P value.55), respectively. IgM and IgG seropositivity for toxoplasma, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and herpes virus were 0/0.77 percent, 0.76/97.69 percent, 1.53/99.23 percent, and 4.61/44.62 percent, respectively, in pregnant women without a negative obstetric history.

It has been determined that TORCH infection is contagious in-utero during the whole course of pregnancy and results in catastrophic consequences for both mother and baby. Therefore, for a healthy pregnancy and improved foetal outcomes, early diagnosis and fast treatment are essential.

Author(s) Details:

Bhanu Priya Panwar,
Department of Microbiology, Sawai Man Singh Medical College and Attached group of Hospitals, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.

Rameshwari Bithu,
Department of Microbiology, Sawai Man Singh Medical College and Attached group of Hospitals, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.

Manju Yadav,
Department of Microbiology, Sawai Man Singh Medical College and Attached group of Hospitals, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.

Rakesh Kumar Maheshwari,
Department of Microbiology, Sawai Man Singh Medical College and Attached group of Hospitals, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.

Bharti Malhotra,
Department of Microbiology, Sawai Man Singh Medical College and Attached group of Hospitals, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.

Please see the link here: https://stm.bookpi.org/ETDHR-V8/article/view/7235

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