Cyclosporine – in the Management of Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions

This study’s objective was to evaluate the effectiveness and security of cyclosporine for the treatment of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (sCADR). In a tertiary care facility in South India, the department of dermato-venereo-leprology undertook a three-year retrospective research. Of the 34 in-patients who encountered adverse medication reactions, 20 patients (one DRESS, ten SJS, and nine TEN patients) who matched the inclusion criteria were selected for the research (ADRs). The offending drug(s) were withheld, standard investigations were carried out, and SCORTEN was used to determine the severity. Additionally excluded were TEN with multiorgan failure and fixed drug eruption. To begin the course of therapy, dexamethasone injections at a dosage of 1 mg/kg per day were given. If not contraindicated, oral cyclosporine was given at a dose of 100 mg once a day for two weeks, then it was lowered to 50 mg a week and stopped after the lesions had healed in patients who had not reacted satisfactorily after three days. The efficacy of cyclosporine was assessed using the average number of stabilisation days, the rate of cutaneous re-epithelialization, and the length of hospitalisation. With the administration of cyclosporine, patients stabilised more rapidly, and re-epithelialization occurred sooner; concomitant steroid therapy helped with the early reduction of steroid dosage. Both the hospital stay and the recuperation time were cut short. Cyclosporine was not related with any deaths, and it appeared to be safe.

Author(s) Details:

V. Anandan,
Dept. of Dermatology, Government Stanley Hospital, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India.

Afthab Jameela Wahab,
Dept. of Dermatology, Government Stanley Hospital, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India.

P. S. Mohana Sundari,
Dept. of Dermatology, Government Stanley Hospital, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India.

Yoga Nandhini,
Dept. of Dermatology, Government Stanley Hospital, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India.

Ragini Rajan,
Dept. of Dermatology, Government Stanley Hospital, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India.

Please see the link here: https://stm.bookpi.org/CODHR-V2/article/view/7748

Keywords: Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, DRESS, SJS, TEN, cyclosporine

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